Things You Find in the Compost Pile

There’s all kinds of shit in my compost pile
I get it from a thoroughbred stable for ten bucks a truckload
it comes mixed with wood shavings
and sometimes stray gravel
too bad there’s sometimes cedar bark too
some things never decay
some things never go away

on a sunny afternoon
my pitchfork exposes things buried deep
like the rambling mycelium of mushrooms softening sticks
and . . . → Read More: Things You Find in the Compost Pile

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Truth Is

Truth is an itch you can’t quite reach to scratch. It’s problematic.

Truth is riding a merry-go-round. Hop on, and I’ll take you from enlightenment to ignorance, back to enlightenment then ignorance, and back again. Can you believe we thought unicorns puke sparkling rainbows? Let’s raise our glasses and drink to our folly and celebrate the fact . . . → Read More: Truth Is

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The Enlightenment of God

Believing himself to be all-knowing, God was perplexed when one day He abruptly popped into existence, and didn’t have the foggiest idea of where He – and, more disturbingly, the universe – had come from.

“Your Splendour,” Doreen, God’s admin assistant said to him after He had settled in to his comfortable office chair. “Your first order . . . → Read More: The Enlightenment of God

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Angie’s Telephone

[T]here are known knowns; there are things we know that we know.
There are known unknowns; that is to say there are things that, we now know we don’t know.
But there are also unknown unknowns – there are things we do not know we don’t know.
—Donald Rumsfeld, Former United States Secretary of Defence

The office that Angela Wright . . . → Read More: Angie’s Telephone

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Metaphors We Die By

This is a philosophical post about something very dear to me: metaphors. Specifically, it’s about the metaphors for success that float around society.

I read a very interesting book some time ago called Metaphors We Live By. Its thesis is that metaphors aren’t just a nice literary flourish; metaphors are how humans understand the world. According to . . . → Read More: Metaphors We Die By

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Two Futures

I used to have a lucrative job at a successful company that was a pioneer in its field. It was a multi-million dollar company run by staff with impressive titles like “Chief Technology Officer” and “Repurposing Specialist.” I went to meetings where visionaries scribbled would-be revolutionary ideas on digital whiteboards. The local newspaper featured articles about . . . → Read More: Two Futures

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The Zombie Economy

It wasn’t always this way.

I would know. As an investment manager for some of the largest banks in the country for over fifty years, I was paid handsomely to know exactly what was going on with the economy. I fussed over GDP, scrutinized unemployment stats, tracked market trends. I rode out the housing crash in 2008, . . . → Read More: The Zombie Economy

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The psychology of identity and conflict

Who are you? Far from being the trivial question it may seem to be, the answer holds the key to a more peaceful world.

This question probes, of course, that slippery concept of identity – a single word used to describe what is in fact many different things. Look up identity on the Internet and your browser . . . → Read More: The psychology of identity and conflict

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Growth, change, and death at Entheos Gathering 2012

“Are you looking forward to going to Entheos?” my wife asks me a few days before I’m set to leave on my five-day trip. “Totally,” I reply, then immediately realize the half-truth of my answer. “But I’m also a bit anxious about it. It’s going to be stretch.”

A stretch indeed. I am, for the most part, . . . → Read More: Growth, change, and death at Entheos Gathering 2012

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Over an Americano and muffin

I’m sitting in a coffee shop on a sunny afternoon, looking out the window. Birds are cheeping, people hurriedly go about their business. I don’t see any of that, though; all I can see is a train careening out of control. My stomach knots.

You know how in a stressful situation everything moves in slow motion? A . . . → Read More: Over an Americano and muffin

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